oppn parties Air India Tries To Address The Problem Of Empty Seats

News Snippets

  • Defence minister Rajnath Singh says India might revise its policy of "no first use" of nuclear weapons in national interest
  • Ravi Sashtri to remain head coach of Team India fro another two years
  • India defends move on Article 370, says entirely an internal matter
  • UN holds closed door meet on Kashmir but China fails in its attempt to censure India
  • Limited public transport service to be restored in J&K from this weekend
  • Educational institutions to reopen in phases from Monday in J&K
  • Government decides to restore telecommunications in phases in J&K starting with landline phones this weekend
  • PM Modi announces that India will have a Chief of Defence Staff soon
  • PM Modi says government worried about population explosion, will introduce schemes to control it
  • Prime Minister Modi explains the decision to read down Article 370 in his address to the nation on the occasion of Independence Day
  • All 6 accused in Pehlu Khan lynching case acquitted
  • Cricketers will now be tested for dope as BCCI decides to come under NADA after a prod from the government
  • NDTV promoters Prannoy and Radhika Roy prevented from travelling abroad. Channel says it amounts to subversion of media freedom
  • TMC spokesman Derek O'Brien questioned for two hours by the CBI on the party mouthpiece 'Jago Bangla'
  • Former finance minister Arun Jaitley has been admitted to AIIMS for breathing problems. His condition is said to be stable
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Air India Tries To Address The Problem Of Empty Seats

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
While travelling to Kolkata from Dibrugarh in Assam on a morning flight of Air India a few days back, one was surprised to see more than a dozen vacant seats on a sector that is generally overbooked, more so when flights had been cancelled for two days due to Cyclone Fani. Empty seats are a total loss to any airline and all efforts must be made to fill up the planes, especially in sectors where there is regular traffic.

Hence, one was pleasantly surprised when Air India announced recently that it would offer huge discounts (up to 40%) on unsold seats up to 3 hours from the scheduled departure of the flight. This means that the airline has taken stock of the situation and is trying to find a remedy for it. Contrary to general perception, this decision of the airline shows that there are some in the upper management who are alive to the situation and are trying to do their best to cut losses.

Consider the above situation. The quoted price of a ticket on that day was about Rs 8000. It would have deterred a few from travelling. It meant that 12 or more seats were left unsold on the flight. Now, if Air India offered the same seats at 40% discount three hours from departure, one is sure that at Rs 4800 (the price that is normally prevalent in the sector even a month in advance), more than 10 seats would have been sold. It would have meant that Air India would have earned nearly Rs 50000 more on that particular flight.

The decision will come as a boon for passengers who have to travel in an emergency. They can now hope to get tickets at a rate similar to one if they had planned the journey one month in advance. This will also mean that the badly bleeding airline will also cut down its losses and fill up its planes. Air India can still turn around if it trims its bloated workforce, streamlines its operations and pays attention to such ostensibly 'small' things which add up to huge losses.