oppn parties Bungling May Allow Polio Type-2 To Make A Comeback

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  • Last date for filing Income Tax returns by salaried employees extended to August 31
  • Supreme Court extends Assam NRC deadline to August 31
  • Prohibitory orders clamped in Bengaluru. Wine shops, pubs, bars and restaurants ordered closed for the next 48 hours
  • Congress still trying to avoid the floor test in Karnataka
  • 75 percent of the jobs in all private sector firms to be reserved for locals in Andhra Pradesh
  • Supreme Court will hear the petition of two independent MLAs seeking a direction to the Karnataka Speaker to hold the trust vote "forthwith"
  • Congress-JD(S) and a partisan Speaker push the Karnataka trust vote to Tuesday
  • Panel submits draft legislation to the government to criminalize mining, investing and trading of crypto-currencies
  • Government panel suggest a ban on crypto-currencies
  • Lok Sabha passes RTI Act amendment bill amid protests by the Opposition
  • Jasprit Bumrah rested for ODIs and T20s
  • Dinesh Kartik ignored across fromats
  • Rohit Sharma included in Test team too while Wriddhiman Saha makes a comeback after injury
  • Virat Kohli retained as captain across formats for the West Indies tour
  • MS Dhoni decides to take a two-month break, will skip West Indies tour but will not retire
Congress-JD(S) government loses trust vote in Karnataka. BJP might stake claim to form the government
oppn parties
Bungling May Allow Polio Type-2 To Make A Comeback

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
Through concerted efforts of the government and the citizens, India has become polio-free. But negligence in supervision threatens to reverse this. It has been reported that a strain of type-2 polio virus has been found in 1.5 lakh vials of three batches of polio vaccine manufactured by Biomed. It has been administered to children in UP, Telengana and Maharashtra.

It needs remembering that type-2 polio virus was withdrawn worldwide in April 2016. This immediately puts children born after that to a serious health risk as they are not immune to this virus. The virus was first detected by the WHO from stool samples in UP. Containment strategies will be put to severe test as the virus mutates in a few months and becomes immune to vaccination.

How the virus failed to be detected at the Central Drug Laboratory in Kasauli – where are drugs samples are sent for approval - is a mystery. It just shows that big loopholes exist in the regulatory framework and a chalta hai attitude is prevalent. It is a big challenge for India to identify children administered with the vaccine, see how far the virus has spread and put in place measures to stop it from spreading further. The children already affected also need to be treated.

This serious lapse shows that just achieving targets and boasting is not enough. In the absence of a strict regulatory framework, polio can make a comeback and threaten the future generations. India needs to drill in the heads of people running its manufacturing units and manning its laboratories and other regulatory checkpoints that playing with lives of people will not be tolerated at all.