oppn parties J&K: Was It Proper To Dissolve The Assembly?

News Snippets

  • JNU students march against the steep hike in fees, keep HRD minister Ramesh Pokhriyal stuck at the venue of the convocation
  • USFDA says Cytotron, an anti-cancer kit developed by Bengaluru based Rajah Vijay Kumar, is a "breakthrough device" for treating liver, pancreatic and breast cancers
  • Car sales show a minuscule uptrend after declining continuously for 11 months
  • Industrial output contracts by 4.3% in September, the worst decline in 8 years
  • Centre defends abrogation of Article 370 in the Supreme Court, says the power under it was used by the President six times previously
  • Legendary singer Lata Mangeshkar admitted to hospital with lung infection, put on ventilator
  • Shiv Sena MP Arvind Sawant quits as Union Minister
  • National Security Advisor Ajit Doval met the leaders of both Hindus and Muslims in Delhi on Sunday to ensure peace and harmony is maintained after the Ayodhya verdict
  • Tipu Jayanti passes off peacefully in Karnataka
  • 10 dead as Cyclone Bulbul leaves destruction in its wake in West Bengal
  • Shefali Verma breaks Sachin's 30-year old record by scoring an international fifty at 15 years and 285 days
  • Former Chief Election Commissioner T N Seshan dies at 87
  • India beat Bangladesh by 30 runs to win the 3rd T20 and clinch the series 2-1. Deepak Chahar becomes the first Indian to take a hat-trick in T20s and returns the best bowling figures of 6/7
  • Centre removes SPG cover of the Gandhis. However, they will still get Z-category security
  • CJI Ranjan Gogoi will have a meeting with UP chief secretary and DGP of the state in his chamber ahead of the verdict on the Ayodhya land dispute next week
India Commentary wishes all its readers a very Happy Guruparab
oppn parties
J&K: Was It Proper To Dissolve The Assembly?

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
The J&K governor Satya Pal Malik was sent to the state with the express purpose of exploring possibilities of installing an elected government in the state. But when push came to shove, the governor dissolved the assembly and pushed the state towards fresh elections. The first bid for forming the government was made by a combined opposition that included the PDP, the National Conference and the Congress. But immediately thereafter, there was a revolt in the PDP with 18 legislators breaking rank. Soon, Sajjad Lone made a counter bid with support from the said 18 legislators and the BJP.

Maybe the governor was swayed by the revolt in the PDP ranks in taking the decision to dissolve the assembly. Maybe he thought neither combination would provide a stable government. But whatever be the reason, there should at least have been an attempt to install an elected government. Maybe the combined opposition should have been given the first chance and if they failed, Sajjad Lone should have been asked to try to form the government. It is always better to attempt forming a government from already elected legislators rather than call for an untimely and expensive election, especially in a sensitive state like J&K.

Having said this, it also needs to be recognized that the governor is the best judge of the ground reality. In J&K, several extraneous factors also need to be weighed in. The governor has been consulting a wide range of opinion in the state for the last few months. He has had detailed discussions with the army over the prevailing security situation. Maybe he thought that a weak government that had low chances of surviving the remaining term was a bad bet. Maybe he thought that people should be asked to provide a fresh mandate as to who should rule the state. Constitutionally, the governor was within his rights to dissolve the assembly.

But the situation is that with voters polarized - those in Jammu area favouring the BJP and to some extent, the Congress and those in the valley favouring either the PDP or the NC with some independents – the chances of another hung assembly looms large. In that case, renewed attempts will be made to form a coalition government. Hence, the same could have been tried in the just dissolved assembly first without forcing the state into conducting another election.