oppn parties Economic Offenders: Beginning Made, But Big Fishes Wanted

News Snippets

  • In reply to a question in Parliament, the government says it is empowered to lawfully intercept, monitor or decrpyt information stored in a computer resource in the interest of sovereignty or integrity of India
  • Police stop a 12-year old girl on her way to the Sabarimala shrine
  • In Karnataka, the JD(S) indicates that it might support the BJP government if it falls short of numbers after the bypolls
  • Congress pips the BJP in local body elections in Rajasthan, winning 961 wards to the BJPs 737
  • After Airtel and Vodafone-Idea, Jio also indicates that tariffs will be raised from December
  • Sources in Shiv Sena say that they might revive the alliance with the BJP if it offers the 50:50 deal
  • A miffed Sanjay Rout of the Shiv Sena says that it will take "100 births" to understand Sharad Pawar
  • Mobile operators Vodafone-Idea and Airtel decide to raise tariffs from next month
  • Sharad Pawar meets Sonia Gandhi and says more time needed for government formation in Maharashtra
  • Justice S A Bobde sworn in as the 47th Chief Justice of India
  • Supreme Court holds hotels liable for theft of vehicle from their parking area if parked by valet, says "owner's risk" clause is not a shield from such liability
  • Finance Minister says she is receiving feedback from many sectors that recovery is happening as there is lower stress
  • Sabarimala temple opens, but police bar the entry of women below 50 years
  • Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman says Air India and BPCL to be sold off by March
  • Media person Rajat Sharma resigns as DDCA president
Two Muslim litigants in Ayodhya refuse to accept the Supreme Court order, say review petition might be filed
oppn parties
Economic Offenders: Beginning Made, But Big Fishes Wanted

By Slogger

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Sunil Garodia Holding an extreme view and carting the ball out of the park is what interests him most. He is a hard hitter at all times. Fasten your seatbelts and read.
It is good that a beginning has been made in bringing back economic offenders who had fled India. That Mohammed Yayha has been apprehended in Bahrain after an Interpol red-corner notice was issued and that India managed to convince the authorities there to deport him just shows that what the government can achieve if there is will. But this instance shows that similar will is not present in other high profile cases, although it may be that Bahrain was more cooperative than UK, the Caribbean countries or other countries where the likes of Vijay Mallya, Mehul Choksi and Nirav Modi have fled.

Although India is pursuing most of the cases abroad, not much headway is being made. Mallya is fighting his cases in UK courts although the banks have got many favourable decisions in respect of attaching his properties abroad. The same is the case of Nirav Modi. But that will neither solve the problem nor deter others. As long as these big fishes are not apprehended and brought back to face trial in India, the public perception will remain that they were tipped off and allowed to flee.

Hence, the government must reexamine its strategy and exert all kinds of legal and diplomatic pressures on countries where these offenders are believed to have fled. In an election year, this is going to be a hot topic. The opposition is going to pan the government for this lapse. Hence, it is required that the government unleashes everything in its armoury to bring them back and clear its name. This government claims to be corruption-free and unsupportive of crony capitalism. Now it has to walk the talk.