oppn parties Fiscal Deficit, Extra Borrowings and GDP

News Snippets

  • Last date for filing Income Tax returns by salaried employees extended to August 31
  • Supreme Court extends Assam NRC deadline to August 31
  • Prohibitory orders clamped in Bengaluru. Wine shops, pubs, bars and restaurants ordered closed for the next 48 hours
  • Congress still trying to avoid the floor test in Karnataka
  • 75 percent of the jobs in all private sector firms to be reserved for locals in Andhra Pradesh
  • Supreme Court will hear the petition of two independent MLAs seeking a direction to the Karnataka Speaker to hold the trust vote "forthwith"
  • Congress-JD(S) and a partisan Speaker push the Karnataka trust vote to Tuesday
  • Panel submits draft legislation to the government to criminalize mining, investing and trading of crypto-currencies
  • Government panel suggest a ban on crypto-currencies
  • Lok Sabha passes RTI Act amendment bill amid protests by the Opposition
  • Jasprit Bumrah rested for ODIs and T20s
  • Dinesh Kartik ignored across fromats
  • Rohit Sharma included in Test team too while Wriddhiman Saha makes a comeback after injury
  • Virat Kohli retained as captain across formats for the West Indies tour
  • MS Dhoni decides to take a two-month break, will skip West Indies tour but will not retire
Congress-JD(S) government loses trust vote in Karnataka. BJP might stake claim to form the government
oppn parties
Fiscal Deficit, Extra Borrowings and GDP

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
The government has decided to borrow Rs 50000cr via the G-Sec market in the remainder of the fiscal year. This obviously means that fiscal deficit (FD) targets are not being kept in check and the target of fiscal deficit of 3.2 of GDP this fiscal is under stress. The last time the government did this was when it borrowed Rs 90000cr in FY12 and then the fiscal deficit target was revised from 4.6 to 5.9% of the GDP. This year, the additional money that the government is seeking to borrow will take the deficit to around 3.5% of the GDP which is within the FRBM norms.

Why this urgent need to borrow funds and why choose the G-Sec route? Let us take the second question first. Experts have pointed out that the government could have drawn its surplus balance with the Reserve Bank instead of borrowing in an already nervous G-Sec market. Other experts believe that this borrowing is the result of fiscal slippages on account of shortfall in RBI dividend and revenue loss in excise due to implementation of GST. That more or less answers the first question.

Then there is the question of economic slowdown. Bank credit is hovering around negative figures and industries are saddled with surplus capacity. Consumption is not rising as households are stressed due to food inflation and rising healthcare and education costs. Revenue collections have fallen due to GST rate cuts. State finances are already in severe disarray. In such a scenario, Central government spending has to increase to give a push to the GDP. The government had shown exemplary restraint in the last three years and had adhered to FD targets. If the current deviance is not made a habit then it is not such a bad deal and might in fact be good in the long run.