oppn parties Fiscal Deficit, Monetary Policy & Inflation

News Snippets

  • Amit Shah says the government will identify and deport illegal immigrants from all parts of the country
  • Reports from Pakistan confirm that Hafiz Saeed has been arrested and sent to jail
  • After the SC order, Karnataka Speaker says he will go by the Constitution in deciding on the resignations of the 16 MLAs
  • Rebel MLAs say they will not attend the trust vote on Thursday
  • Supreme Court rules that rebel MLAs cannot be forced to attend the assembly and vote in the floor test
  • Both the Centre and the Assam government have sought re-verification of up to 20% of draft NRC data
  • Pakistan opens its airspace for Indian planes
  • Dilapidated building collapses in Mumbai, killing more than 10 people while many were still trapped
  • Kulbhushan Jadhav case verdict to be delivered today by the ICJ
  • A Vistara flight landed in Lucknow with just 5 to 10 minutes of fuel left in the tank
  • Supreme Court to decide on Karnataka MLAs plea today
  • Karnataka alliance to face floor test on Thursday
  • China says that the next Dalai Lama will be appointed by it
  • Pakistan assures India that no anti-India activity would be allowed in the Kartarpur corridor
  • Pakistan to allow visa-free access to 5000 pilgrims every day to undertake pilgrimage using the Kartarpur corridor
ISRO calls-off Chandrayaan-2 mission launch at last moment due to technical snags. revised date will be announced later
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Fiscal Deficit, Monetary Policy & Inflation

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
In its latest policy review, the RBI expectedly maintained status quo and left key lending rates unchanged. It was expected because of two main reasons: retail inflation shot to a nine-month high in June and although the RBI has cut repo rates ( rates at which it provides short term funds to banks) by 75 basis points since January this year, the banks have passed on only 30 basis points to the end consumer. The RBI was clear in saying that further rate reduction depends on how inflation pans out and how commercial banks pass on rate reduction to consumers.

But as a belligerent government wishes to bring down interest rates despite inflationary pressure, there is little the RBI would be able to do in future if the latest revised financial code put up by the finance ministry is anything to go by. The code seeks to take away the veto power the RBI governor has in matters of setting lending rates. Even before this policy review, there were indications from the ministry that the time was ripe for another rate cut.

Although the RBI governor Raghuram Rajan has been quoted as saying that he isn’t opposed to the idea of taking away of the veto power, this clearly goes against the recommendation of the Financial Sector Legislative Reforms Commission (FSLRC), which had advised for the same “in exceptional circumstances.” It is also incongruous to have a body that is saddled with containing inflation but whose chief does not have a say in the amount of money that is to float in the economy.

Rajan pointed out that a committee formed to take monetary policy decisions would bring in different view-points, will reduce the pressure on one individual and would ensure continuity (as it would be reconstituted even if one member exits). But one is certain that the RBI has internal committees to take these decisions. The point is that if the RBI governor feels that inflation would be jacked up if rates are reduced or more money is injected in the economy at a particular point of time, he should have the right to refuse taking such a decision. If not, he should not be responsible for containing inflation.