oppn parties Is Unsubsidized, Low-Cost Meal Business Sustainable?

News Snippets

  • Supreme Court holds hotels liable for theft of vehicle from their parking area if parked by valet, says "owner's risk" clause is not a shield from such liability
  • Finance Minister says she is receiving feedback from many sectors that recovery is happening as there is lower stress
  • Sabarimala temple opens, but police bar the entry of women below 50 years
  • Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman says Air India and BPCL to be sold off by March
  • Media person Rajat Sharma resigns as DDCA president
  • Shiv Sena, NCP and Congress postpone meeting the governor of Maharashtra
  • Shiv Sena not to attend the NDA meeting on 17th November, says break up "a formality"
  • Shiv Sena says that the confidence the BJP is showing about forming the government in Maharashtra is based purely on its expectation of getting numbers through horse trading
  • Anil Ambani resigns as director of the bankrupt Reliance Communications
  • India beat Bangladesh by an innings and 150 rums inside three days in the first Test. Indian pacers excel after Mayank Agarwal's double century
  • Sena-NCP-Congress work out a common minimum programme, will form the government soon and it will last 5 years, says Sharad Pawar
  • Income Tax Appellate Tribunal upholds the decision to withdraw the charitable status of Young India, making it liable to pay Rs 145 in income tax. Rahul Gandhi and Priyanka Vadra are the majority shareholders in the company
  • CBI raids offices of Amnesty International across India
  • Supreme Court quashes NCLAT order against Arcelor Mittal and paves the way for the company to take over ailing Essar Steel
  • Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman says concerns of telcos will be addressed and no company will close down
Two Muslim litigants in Ayodhya refuse to accept the Supreme Court order, say review petition might be filed
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Is Unsubsidized, Low-Cost Meal Business Sustainable?

By admin

About the Author

Sunil Garodia By our team of in-house writers.
Kolkata is known to be a pocket-friendly city when it comes to food. But what one saw opposite RK Mission Sishu Mangal hospital on Sarat Bose Road a few weeks back was truly amazing. A vendor was selling a full meal comprising rice, dal and sabzi at just Rs 6 – yes, you read it right, just Rs 6. In a brightly-painted pushcart, he had three containers full of his wares. One helper was spooning out the three items one by one and placing them on plates. There was a steady stream of people asking for the food. The vendor is publicity shy and was averse to disclosing his name or how he managed to make profits selling at such a low price. But he made the point that his stall was not part of any government scheme and was not subsidized by anyone. It was his own venture and yes, he paid salaries to his staff and made enough profits to call his venture a success.

We asked one of the students who was having his lunch there about the quality of the food. He was categorical in saying that the food quality was excellent given the rate. As for the portions, he was of the opinion that if one had low appetite, one helping was filling enough but if one ate more, two helpings were more than enough to satisfy the hunger of almost anyone. We asked others and most were of the same opinion.

There are other low-cost meals served in various cities. There are Amma Canteens in Tamil Nadu which serve a amma-canteen4_759_pongal-and-idlis-for-breakfast-sambar-rice-and-curd-rice-for-lunch-and-chapatis-and-dal-for-dinner-at-pocket-friendly-prices-source_-rakesh-reddygovernment-subsidized meal at Rs 6 to Rs 10.

Bengaluru has the copycat Indira Canteens 12BGINDIRACANTEEN that serve breakfast, lunch and dinner at subsidized rates.

There is an eatery owner in Mangalore 03mn_mnrav_meal+07MN_FOOD.jpgwho serves full lunch at Rs 10, while there is a rapidly expanding startup in Gurugram branded as Janta Meals 8-400x200that serves wholesome ghar ka khana at Rs 20 to Rs 30. But this Kolkata vendor making profits after filling stomachs at just Rs 6, without any government subsidy or corporate backing, is a revelation. He has proved that low-cost nutrition can be made available to the people by socially-conscious entrepreneurs.