oppn parties A Pragmatic Speech Some Found Boring

News Snippets

  • Amit Shah says the government will identify and deport illegal immigrants from all parts of the country
  • Reports from Pakistan confirm that Hafiz Saeed has been arrested and sent to jail
  • After the SC order, Karnataka Speaker says he will go by the Constitution in deciding on the resignations of the 16 MLAs
  • Rebel MLAs say they will not attend the trust vote on Thursday
  • Supreme Court rules that rebel MLAs cannot be forced to attend the assembly and vote in the floor test
  • Both the Centre and the Assam government have sought re-verification of up to 20% of draft NRC data
  • Pakistan opens its airspace for Indian planes
  • Dilapidated building collapses in Mumbai, killing more than 10 people while many were still trapped
  • Kulbhushan Jadhav case verdict to be delivered today by the ICJ
  • A Vistara flight landed in Lucknow with just 5 to 10 minutes of fuel left in the tank
  • Supreme Court to decide on Karnataka MLAs plea today
  • Karnataka alliance to face floor test on Thursday
  • China says that the next Dalai Lama will be appointed by it
  • Pakistan assures India that no anti-India activity would be allowed in the Kartarpur corridor
  • Pakistan to allow visa-free access to 5000 pilgrims every day to undertake pilgrimage using the Kartarpur corridor
ISRO calls-off Chandrayaan-2 mission launch at last moment due to technical snags. revised date will be announced later
oppn parties
A Pragmatic Speech Some Found Boring

By Sunil Garodia

About the Author

Sunil Garodia Editor-in-Chief of indiacommentary.com. Current Affairs analyst and political commentator. Writes for a number of publications.
When Narendra Modi stood on the ramparts of Red Fort on 15th August, 2014, he was there fresh from a massive electoral victory (just three months ago) that had propelled him from being the CM of Gujarat to being the Prime Minister of India. While to some he seemed to be still in the campaign mode, he had then brought to the microphone the aspirations of the voters and he let them hear what they wanted to. He announced new initiatives and spelled out his vision. As he repeatedly said, he was an outsider in Delhi. That, then, was his strong point. He could say anything without fear.

Now, one year down the line, Narendra Modi has seen how being an outsider has its share of advantages and disadvantages. He has seen how his initiatives to reform the economy have been stalled due to his alliance’s lack of numbers in Rajya Sabha. He has seen how the opposition cares a hoot about what seems urgent to him. He has seen how they are bent on showing him his place â€" that is outside Delhi.

So this year’s speech was like the middle overs in a limited overs cricket match. He knew the fielding restrictions are off, so there are lesser chances of big hitting. Hence, there were no new schemes announced. He knows it is a time of consolidation. So he told the audience that the Jan Dhan Yojana is a success, delivering banking to so many citizens. He told the people that more than 20 lakh have given up gas subsidy. He sought to assure the nation that despite the lull, things were moving in the right direction. He wanted to tell them that things take time to be implemented, but the process was on.

Basically, the Prime Minister wants us to know that the current difficulties are a passing phase and the government will find a way out of the impasse and implement its policies. For the sake of the nation, one hopes that this happens. Like a seasoned campaigner, Modi eschewed bravado and touched on only those things he thought would go down well with the people. And suddenly, he became boring to most people. Perhaps he should have announced several new schemes that would not have been implemented just to keep people happy. But then, that is not the way Modi operates. Even his detractors know that.